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Posts Tagged ‘History’

Sakura In The Center Of Yerevan In Memory Of The Japanese People

May 2, 2011 4 comments

 What I saw today was really beautiful and breathtaking. There’s a sakura tree growing right at the center of our city. Who could ever think of it?

The plate on the fence says: “In Memory of the Japanese People.” And there’s a signature beneath: “SAMURAI.”

The tree is planted in front of the “Samurai” sushi-bar at the beginning of Baghramyan avenue. But it is very modest and unnoticeable. I wouldn’t notice it if a couple of women weren’t standing there examining the japanese phenomenon.

Actually, Sakura is a cherry tree. But it is also the symbol of Japan.  The cherry blossom is the flower of flowers to the Japanese people. It symbolizes their national character. This is because the life of a samurai of feudal times was proverbially compared to the short-lived cherry blossoms that last “no more than three days”, for a samurai was always ready to sacrifice his life for the sake of his master. Another saying is that “what the cherry is among flowers is the samurai among men”.

We remember the victims of Japanese disasters and mourn with the world.

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幸运的孔子… oops… I Mean, Lucky Confucius!

April 20, 2011 4 comments

On April 11, 2011, Li Changchun, the Propaganda chief of the Communist Party of China, which appeared to be quite a high rank, came to visit Armenia. The purpose of the visit was the openning ceremony of Confucius statue in the yard of the Yerevan State Linguistic University after V. Brusov.

Actually, there is a Confucius Institute which works in one of the university’s buildings, so it was their initiative to memorize the great philosopher.

Anyway, I remember the day. Three hours before Comrade Changchun’s arrival the university was almost empty. Also the Armenian Prime Minister was to attend the event. So there were uniformed people with huge beast-dogs walking around and checking all the corners of our old good Brusov. I wonder now, were these security measures for the Prime Minister or the highly ranked guest?

Now the most interesting part of the story. I’m not sure if the statue was opened that day, as the next day when me and my friends decided to visit the philosopher’s monument, we were quite surprised to find only the stone with his name on it (frankly, it looked like a tombstone (R.I.P)). Where had Confucius gone after the party?

Anyway, he’s back now and standing right in front of the canteen of the university and proudly follows Brusov girls with sight. Lucky Confucius!

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